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Business at the Speed of Light

Business at the Speed of Light

California Productivity

Below is a survey of indexes that measure California’s productivity and overall economic environment. Following this survey are separate sections detailing how California competes relative to access to venture capital, knowledge-based economy, and its relative domination in a range of industry sectors.

Best Places to Work: California metro areas hold 6 of the top 10 slots for areas to do business and advance a career. California also holds 10 of the top 25 spots. Top California locations include San Diego (1st), Santa Rosa (2nd), Ventura (4th), San Louis Obispo (7th), Oakland (8th), Orange County (10th), Riverside-San Bernardino (11th), and Vallejo (15th). This index, published in 2002, evaluates wages, jobs growth, high-tech GDP, and job momentum.

Best Performing Cities: California metro areas hold 4 of the top 25 slots for areas that are best to create and sustain jobs. Top California locations include Riverside-San Bernardino (3rd), Bakersfield (17th), Vallejo-Fairfield (22nd), and Sacramento–Arden-Arcade–Roseville (25th). This index, published in 2007, evaluates job and wage growth.

Growth in Gross State Product (GSP): California’s percentage increase in Gross State Product exceeds that of the U.S. in 8 of the last 15 years for which data is available.

Exports: Exports from California accounted for 12% of total U.S. exports in 2006. California’s export shipments of merchandise in 2006 totaled $128 billion, ranking California 2nd only to Texas ($151 billion) among the states in terms of total exports. California leads the nation in export-supported jobs – 1 in 7 jobs is related to trade.

Manufacturing Strengthening: California has 4 of the top 5 strongest manufacturing regions in the West, which is comprised of Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, Nevada, and Washington. California’s top regions include: Yuba City-Maryville, San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, Fresno-Madera, and Stockton.

Access to Venture Capital

Below is a summary of indexes on businesses’ access to venture capital. California has consistently been a leader in attracting venture capital; although other states are beginning to close the gap.

Impact of Venture Capital: California is the leader in revenues tied to venture- backed companies with $507 billion, followed by Texas ($274 billion), Washington ($127 billion), Pennsylvania ($113 billion), and Massachusetts ($112 billion). Venture-backed companies contributed to 10 million jobs and $2.1 trillion in revenues nationally in 2005.

The 5 states with the highest employment attributable to venture-backed companies were California (2.2 million jobs), Texas (1.1 million jobs), Pennsylvania (697,000 jobs), Massachusetts (640,000 jobs), and Georgia (604,000 jobs).

Growth Rate of Venture-Backed Companies: California had the 2nd highest growth in revenues attributed to venture-backed companies among 50 states during 2003-2005, growing 12.9%. Other states with high growth rates for revenues include Connecticut (14.5%), Washington (12.6%), Illinois (12.3%), Texas (11.7%), Georgia (11.6%), and Minnesota (11.2%).

Highest Venture Capital Investments by Region: California had 4 of the top 18 regions in the nation for venture capital investments, including Silicon Valley (34.22%), San Diego (6.04%), Los Angeles/Orange County (3.62%), and Sacramento (0.7%). Other top performing regions include New England (12.28%) and the Southeast (6.84%).

Fastest Growing Venture Capital Investments by Region: Los Angeles ranks 4th among the top 5 fastest growing regions for venture capital investments, representing a 155% increase in investments and a 72% increase in the number of companies over the past 10 years. Other top performing regions include New Mexico with a 375% increase in investments and a 650% increase in the number of companies, Pittsburgh/Tristate with a 513% growth in investments and a 267% increase in the number of companies, Seattle with a 211% growth in investments and a 103% increase in the number of companies, and the Washington DC Metroplex with a 130% growth rate in investments and a 71% increase in the number of companies.

Below is a summary of indexes on the components of a high technology economy. While California scores well in most categories, these indexes also provide evidence that other states are becoming increasingly competitive in knowledge-based industries.

Knowledge-Based Economy: California ranks 2nd among 50 states related to 12 key criteria for future high tech growth. Other top performing states in the index include Massachusetts (1st), Colorado (3rd), Connecticut (4th), and Maryland (5th). This 2001 index ranks states based on research and development dollars, number of patents issued, venture capital investment, business starts, and IPO proceeds.

Biotechnology Transfer to Commercialization: The University of California ranks 2nd with Caltech 3rd and Stanford 4th among all universities for biotechnology transfer. MIT scores 1st and University of Florida ranks 5th.

Educational Attainment: California ranks 8th among 50 states relative to people over 25 years of age with a bachelor’s degree or greater. Other top performing states in the index include Massachusetts (1st), Connecticut (2nd), Maryland (3rd), Colorado, (4th), New Jersey (5th), Vermont (6th), and New Hampshire (7th). California ranks 10th among states relative to the percentage of persons over 25 years who have advanced degrees and 14th for the percentage of persons over 25 who are doctoral scientists.

Federal R&D: California ranks 8th among 50 states relative to the percentage of federal R&D dollars per capita. Other top performing states in the index include Maryland (1st), New Mexico (2nd), Vermont (3rd), Maryland (4th), Georgia (5th), Alabama (6th), and Rhode Island (7th). California ranks 7th among states for industry dollars expended and 15th for academic dollars expended per capita for R&D.

Patents Issued: California ranks 1st among 50 states for patents issued in 2006 when 25,043 total patents were granted. Other top performing states include Texas (6,717 patents), New York (6,407 patents), Massachusetts (4,369 patents), and Michigan (4,179 patents).

California’s $1.7 billion economy ranks 8th in the world. The state has the largest population, comprised of over 11% of the total United States population. Below is a selection of industry sectors and where the state ranks nationally relative to business start-up and expansions.

Aerospace: California ranks 1st in start-ups and 1st in new branches in aerospace. Other top ranking states include Florida, Texas, Washington, and New York for start-ups and Florida, Texas, Washington, and Virginia in new branches.

Agribusiness/Food Processing: California ranks 2nd in start-ups and 1st in new branches in agribusiness and food processing. Other top ranking states include Florida, Texas, Michigan, and New York for start-ups and Texas, Florida, Illinois, and Georgia in new branches.

Automotive Original Equipment Manufactures (OEMs): California ranks 1st in start-ups and 5th in new branches in automotive OEMs. Other top ranking states include Texas, Florida, Michigan, and Indiana for start-ups and Michigan, Texas, Ohio, and Indiana in new branches.

Auto Suppliers: California ranks 2nd in start-ups and 2nd in new branches in auto supplies. Other top ranking states include Michigan, Texas, Indiana, and Ohio for start-ups and Michigan, Texas, Ohio, and Kentucky in new branches.

Bioscience: California ranks 1st in start-ups and 1st in new branches in bioscience. Other top ranking states include Florida, Texas, Massachusetts, and New York for start-ups and Texas, Florida, Pennsylvania, and New York in new branches.

Health Services: California ranks 1st in start-ups and 1st in new branches in health sciences. Other top ranking states include Florida, Texas, New York, and Michigan for start-ups and Texas, Florida, Pennsylvania, and New York in new branches.

Manufacturing: California ranks 1st in start-ups and 1st in new branches in manufacturing. Other top ranking states include Texas, Florida, New York, and Michigan for start-ups and Texas, Illinois, Florida, and Michigan in new branches.

High-Tech Manufacturing: California ranks 1st in start-ups and 1st in new branches in high-tech manufacturing. Other top ranking states include Texas, Florida, New York, and Michigan for start-ups and Texas, Florida, Missouri, and New York in new branches.

Medical Device Manufacturing: California ranks 1st in start-ups and 1st in new branches in medical device manufacturing. Other top ranking states include Texas, Florida, New York, and Ohio for start-ups and Texas, Florida, Ohio, and Massachusetts in new branches.

Pharmaceuticals: California ranks 1st in start-ups and 5th in new branches in pharmaceuticals. Other top ranking states include New Jersey, Florida, Texas, and New York for start-ups and New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Illinois in new branches.

Telecom: California ranks 1st in start-ups and 1st in new branches in telecom. Other top ranking states include Texas, Florida, New York, and Michigan for start-ups and Texas, Missouri, Florida, and Georgia in new branches.

Transportation: California ranks 1st in start-ups and 2nd in new branches in transportation. Other top ranking states include Florida, Texas, Michigan, and New York for start-ups and Texas, Illinois, Florida, and New York in new branches.

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